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Re: The Ceyleib People - Tanyet (1968)


Lybuk Hyd - guitar, sitar
Michael Sean Deasy - drums, vocals
Joseph Osborn - bass, engineer
Larry Knechtel - bass, keyboards
Jim Gordon - drums
Ben Benay - sitar
Mike Melvion - keyboards
Jim Horn - woodwinds
Ry Cooder - guitar

The Ceyleib People to bardzo ciekawy, studyjny projekt zrealizowany dla wytwórni Vault w 1967. Głównym jego pomysłodawcą i wykonawcą jest znany gitarzysta Ry Cooder. Płyta jest niezwykłą fuzją psychodelii opartej na brzmieniach instrumentów orientalnych (sitar) i gitarowych "chropowatości" rodem a la Captain Beefheart. Grupa nagrała tylko tę jedyną płytę.

Ry Cooder's Ceyleib People are arguably one of the more innovative groups of the late 60s. Taking the loping blues romp of Captain Beefheart and filtering it through Indian music, the group created a very short album, what would be an EP now, of two 10-11 minute parts. For 1967, this is definitely hippy experimental music, hopping from guitar riffs to sitar drones to mellotron rambling and back without regard for convention. It's almost as if there was an intent to fuse the influences of Ravi Shankar with those of the old blues legends, except that rarely is there any true juxtaposition of both styles, instead one will start out and then give way to another, segment by segment. It's as if someone gave a studio the masters for several Ravi Shankar and Captain Beefheart albums, asked them to splice them together, and then left, only to have the engineer play a joke by adding parts of Days of Future Passed in as well. Overall, it's a pretty successful experiment especially considering its age. The reissue of the album gives you two new versions of the two pieces, "Aton" and "Aton II," supposedly processed, but not really sounding all that much different from the first two. While this might not have been so impressive had it been from a few years later, its presence in 1967 is quite prescient --- Mike McLatchey

Fuzz Acid & Flowers:

A studio-only West Coast group, most of whose personnel went on to greater achievements. Osborne, as a member of The Dillards and later as a session musician for Simon and Garfunkel among others; Knechtel as a member of Bread and session musician for Dave Mason, Lee Michaels, Art Garfunkel and Neil Diamond among others, and Cooder, of course, has made many significant solo albums and done session work for numerous artists. The album is an excellent collection of Indian-influenced instrumentals. --- Vernon Joynson/Stephane Rebeschini

3 komentarze:

Ankh pisze...

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adamus67 pisze...



The Ceyleib People,West Coast group very curious studio project completed for the Vault label in 1967. Produced by : Mike Deasy

The album is a remarkable fusion of psychedelic sounds based on oriental instruments (sitar), and Guitar "roughness" straight a la Captain Beefheart. The band recorded only this one album,most of personnel went on to greater achievements. Osborne, as a member of The Dillards and later as a session musician for Simon and Garfunkel among others; Knechtel as a member of Bread and session musician for Dave Mason, Lee Michaels, Art Garfunkel and Neil Diamond among others, and Cooder, of course, has made many significant solo albums and done session work for numerous artists. The album is an excellent collection of Indian-influenced instrumentals this is definitely hippy experimental music, hopping from guitar riffs to sitar drones to mellotron rambling and back without regard for convention. It's almost as if there was an intent to fuse the influences of Ravi Shankar with those of the old blues legends, except that rarely is there any true juxtaposition of both styles, instead one will start out and then give way to another, segment by segment. It's as if someone gave a studio the masters for several Ravi Shankar and Captain Beefheart albums, asked them to splice them together, and then left, only to have the engineer play a joke by adding parts of Days of Future Passed in as well. Overall, it's a pretty successful experiment especially considering its age.

On some blogs / sites do not hesitate to credit this disc Ry Cooder then he has no role in Lead Guitar, Production etc ... at the time (1965-1967) it was mostly a studio musician who quite trendy Blues recorded in the register in 1965, the LP "Rising Sons" with Taj Mahal and subsequently registered with Captain Beefheart on the LP "Milk is Safe "in 1967. Respect for the original members who have and still fill our ears with music so sublime mixture.

adamus67 pisze...

Probably the only reason anyone remembers The Ceyleib People these days is the participation of Ry Cooder, credited as 'Cooter', although other band members, not least Larry Knechtel, went on to make names for themselves in the '70s. Tanyet is their one, ridiculously short album, best described as a reasonable example of then-fashionable raga rock, to the extent that one of their guitarists, Lybuk Hyd, doubled on sitar to the point where he could be said to be a sitarist doubling on guitar. Despite Knechtel's presence (known as a singer), the album is almost entirely instrumental, although it seems he may have contributed in other areas.

Either Knechtel or Mike Melvoin (or both?) play Chamberlin on the album, with a clunky flute part on Leyshem and some full-on strings on Ceyladd Beyta. A quick word at this point on the album's tracklisting: although each side lists half a dozen separate tracks, they all essentially run into each other, so whether I've actually highlighted the correct tracks can only really be a matter for conjecture. More strings on Becal and Todda BB, played fast enough to almost fool the ear into thinking they're real (can't do that on a Mellotron), making side one pretty Chamby-heavy. More on side two, with what sounds like muted brass on Ralin and maybe trumpets (more high-speed playing) on closer Manyatt Dyl Com, making (presumably) Ceyladd Beyta the album's top Chamby track.

Well album has mere 21 minutes long lessens the chance of boring your potential audience, I suppose; there's something to be said for not outstaying your welcome... I've no idea why they recorded so little material; maybe it was all they'd written, if you can call this 'written' at all? It's actually pretty good at what it does, in an acid-fried kind of way, and if it kick-started Cooder's career, it was certainly worth doing. Definitely worth hearing if you're into the era; decent Chamberlin use, too, which is rare enough to be worth commenting on in itself. Incidentally, the '91 CD issue doubles the album's length by including mono and stereo versions, which aren't wildly different, but you're going to get them anyway, as I'm sure the original vinyl's as rare as rocking-horse shit.

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Adam

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